Transgender Studies Quarterly

WE'RE CHANGING GENDER

Over the past two decades, transgender studies has become fertile ground for new approaches to cultural analysis. TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly offers a high-profile venue for innovative research and scholarship that contest the objectification, pathologization, and exoticization of transgender lives. It publishes interdisciplinary work that explores the diversity of gender, sex, sexuality, embodiment, and identity in ways that have not been adequately addressed by feminist and queer scholarship. Its mission is to foster a vigorous conversation among scholars, artists, activists, and others that examines how “transgender” comes into play as a category, a process, a social assemblage, an increasingly intelligible gender identity, an identifiable threat to gender normativity, and a rubric for understanding the variability and contingency of gender across time, space, and cultures. Major topics addressed in the first few issues include the cultural production of trans communities, critical analysis of transgender population studies, transgender biopolitics, radical critiques of political economy, and problems of translating gender concepts and practices across linguistic communities.

Academic editors: Susan Stryker and Francisco Galarte

Call for Papers

CFP: TSQ 6.4 “Trans Futures”

Editors: micha cárdenas and Jian Neo Chen

We must write the future, and we must critique the very concept of futurity. Making a claim to trans futures, this TSQ special issue focuses on trans approaches to meanings, times, and embodiments of futurity as they have been created and used in transgender studies, and in trans cultures and political movements. At a moment when imagining trans futures seems particularly urgent in the interplay between fundamentalist and neoliberal forms of cisgender hetero-patriarchal white supremacy, we call for critical discussions of the ways in which trans people have been represented and socially located in relationship to the future through ideological systems and institutional networks (the state, prison network, the military, the police, psych-medical science, mediated culture, the university, civil society, law, art economies, transnational corporations and finance, etc.). We invite critical and creative work that produces and imagines potential trans futures by engaging the multiple materialities and temporalities of trans living. We use the term trans to recognize multiple embodiments, expressions, and identities of gender nonconformity and variance that exceed racially constituted white cisgender/sex, while maintaining links to transgender's resistant repurposing of Western psycho-medical science and to trans*'s broad inclusiveness based on the algorithmic command to "trans everything."

From the location of the issue editors in the US, in this moment of the second year of the Trump presidential administration, who won the presidency despite losing the popular vote by millions of votes, the future of trans people seems to be in question. After increased visibility in 2014 for trans women of color, and the resulting increase in murders in subsequent years, the moves by the current president of the US to roll back trans bathroom protections and military employment opportunities enacted by Obama signals to many an increasing possibility for more danger for trans people in the coming years. As such, the imperative to imagine liberatory futures for trans people feels more urgent. Yet, in doing so, there is a danger of reinscribing trans people as they are commonly figured: as from the future, as new, as a result of recent medical advances, as an experiment. Moving to a transnational frame of trans studies adds necessary depth and complexity to this consideration of futurity.

Decolonial considerations, trans of color and transfeminist critiques point to long histories and material dimensions of gender transgressions. The artwork of Giuseppe Campuzano points to Incan mythologies of gods, stretching back thousands of years, with the ability to change gender at will. In Black on Both Sides, Riley Snorton studies black trans archives to articulate how “race, then, becomes a way of thinking history doubly, or of thinking about the history of historicity, wherein one transitive relation within blackness and transness expresses what Fanon described as ‘the real leap… [of] introducing invention into existence.’” Here Snorton challenges simple conceptions of temporality to gesture towards new future possibilities (2017: 8-9). Still, transgender studies scholars such as Sandy Stone and micha cárdenas have argued that trans phenomena provide important ways of understanding emerging technologies including networked communication, VR/AR and algorithms (2016). In The War of Desire and Technology, Stone sees evidence for the fundamental multiplicity of identity in online forms of communication (1996: 33). In The Transreal, cárdenas argues that artists working with multiple realities can learn from trans artists about crossing realities and creating identities with multiple components (2011: 23). The popular term trans* relies on an algorithmic syntax from the Linux and DOS operating systems to refer to “trans anything”, including transgender, transsexual and more, showing the imbrication of technology and figurations of trans identities. Qwo-Li Driskill has remembered and mobilized a third asegi Cherokee Two-Spirit history and time that disrupts European systems of gender and sexuality, which have been mapped onto Indigenous nations and bodies through cycles of colonization (2017: 39-100). Emi Koyama’s The Transfeminist Manifesto analyzes the material impacts of the cis-heterosexist patriarchal construction of gender and sex on trans women and calls for a transfeminist movement of the future “by and for trans women who view their liberation to be intrinsically linked to the liberation of all women and beyond,” while welcoming “queers, intersex people, trans men, non-trans women, non-trans men and others who are sympathetic toward needs of trans women and consider their alliance with trans women to be essential for their own liberation” (2001: 1-2). 

We call for submissions of essays and creative work that engage the issue’s theme in relationship to emerging areas of transgender studies, especially (but not limited to):

  • Transfeminist and trans women/femme of color futures
  • Trans of color and indigenous futurisms
  • Trans technologies
  • Algorithmic analysis
  • Trans media
  • Trans times and temporalities
  • Trans space
  • Disability
  • Trans materialities
  • Decolonial and racial histories and formations
  • Trans reproduction
  • Necropolitics and biopolitics
  • Trans species
  • Trans embodiments
  • Trans ecologies
  • Youth, coming-of-age, and aging
  • Global and transnational temporalities

We welcome submissions from 1000 to 4000 words in length that engage a wide range of methods, disciplines, lineages, and practices.

Please send complete submissions by October 26, 2018. To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/tsq. If this is your first time using Editorial Manager, please register first, then proceed with submitting your manuscript. If you have any difficulties with the process, contact the journal at tsqjournal at gmail.com. All manuscripts must be double-spaced, including quotations and endnotes, and blinded throughout. You must also submit an abstract, keywords, and biographical note at the time of initial submission. Please visit the editorial office's website for a detailed style guide. Questions for the editors of this issue may be addressed to micha cárdenas (michamc at uw.edu) and Jian Chen (chen.982 at osu.edu).

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is an academic journal, edited by Susan Stryker and Frank Galarte, published by Duke University Press. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Every issue of TSQ will be a specially themed issue that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other special issues, visit  http://lgbt.arizona.edu/transgender-studies-quarterly.  For information about subscriptions, visit https://www.dukeupress.edu/tsq-transgender-studies-quarterly.

Call for Papers: General Issue

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Volume 7, Issue 1

Issue Editor: Francisco J. Galarte

Although most issues of TSQ are special issues devoted to a particular theme, one issue each year is a general, open-call, non-themed issue. We are pleased to invite submission for TSQ 7.1, our next open call issue, to be published in the first quarter of 2020. We welcome works of varying lengths, on any topic that substantively engages with ‘trans’ as a subject of inquiry, methodology, or field of study. We especially encourage submissions that consider intersections of trans studies with other fields of study rooted in the critical analysis of minoritized populations such as people of color and people with disabilities, that engage with feminism, challenge trans studies’ emphasis on the global north, disrupt or productively complicate the dominance English in trans studies, or which include and esteem the embodied knowledge of trans persons outside of the academy.

The expected range for scholarly articles is 5000 to 7000 words, and 1000 to 2000 words for shorter critical essays and descriptive accounts. Illustrations should be included with both completed submissions and abstracts. Submissions must be received by January 29, 2019. Any questions about the issue should be addressed to our editorial office: tsqjournal@gmail.com.

To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/tsq. For step-by-step submission instructions, please visit our website: https://lgbt.arizona.edu/content/guides-authors. All manuscripts must be double-spaced, including quotations and endnotes, and blinded throughout. Submissions will include an abstract (150 words or less), keywords (3-5 for indexing), and a brief author's biographical note (50 words or less) at the time of initial submission. Please visit http://www.dukeupress.edu/Assets/Downloads/TSQ_sg.pdf for a detailed style guide.

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is co-edited by Susan Stryker and Francisco J. Galarte, and published by Duke University Press, with editorial offices at the University of Arizona’s department of gender and women’s studies. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Most issues of TSQ is a specially themed issue that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces, with one issue each year being an open call, general issue. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other issues, visit http://lgbt.arizona.edu/transgender-studies-quarterly For info about subscriptions, visit http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=45648.

Call for Papers: Trans Pornography

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 7.2
Spring 2020
Editors: Sophie Pezzutto and Susan Stryker

For many people, trans and cis alike, pornography is the first point of contact with trans identities, communities, and subcultures. And yet, trans studies has not effectively engaged with the topic of trans porn. Conversely, pornography scholarship tends to marginalize trans porn as a genre of significance, even though on pornhub.com, the largest pornography website on the internet, there are more trans porn titles than titles in other popular categories as “Asian” or “bondage.” The prominence of trans pornography has only increased in recent years as trans visibility has increased in society at large.

For this special issue of TSQ, we solicit work on all aspects of trans pornography, whether written or visual, historical or contemporary, actual or fictional; commercial or community-based, including studies of production, distribution, consumption, and reception; textual and visual analysis; and social-scientific work on people who make or consume porn. In addition to full-length scholarly articles we will consider for publication first-person accounts, shorter essays, opinion pieces, poetry, artwork, and other forms creative expression that fit the theme of trans pornography. We encourage contributions from a wide range of contributors including academics, independent researchers, activists, and, importantly, former and current sex workers.

Proposals might address, but are not limited to:

  • The popularity of trans pornography in light of the concurrent marginalization of trans people
  • The history of trans pornography as a genre, including both written and visual works
  • Aesthetic and political dimension of trans pornography
  • The changing economic, spatial, and social structure of the pornography industry in the age of the internet
  • social media and trans pornography
  • the relationship of pornography to other kinds of sex work.
  • Issues of race, disability, and bodily diversity in representation of trans people in pornography
  • The relative absence of trans men and trans masculinities in trans pornography
  • The shifting classification of trans pornography in relation to other pornographic ‘categories’ such as straight, gay, and fetish pornography
  • The legal status of trans pornography and its relationship to various obscenity laws and morality crusades
  • The sociocultural significance of and issues related to trans pornography in countries outside the U.S. and Europe (Global South, Asia, Latin America, Africa, etc)
  • The relationship of trans pornography to feminist and trans scholarship past and present
  • The relationship between the mainstream trans pornography industry and alternative, independent pornography movements
  • Past and present trans performer’s lived experiences, including physical, mental and emotional health, suicidality, and working conditions such as pay, safety, HIV prevention, and violence

The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2019. The expected length for scholarly articles is 5000 to 7000 words and 1000 to 2000 words for shorter works. All manuscripts should be prepared for anonymous peer review with scholarly citations in Chicago author-date citation style. The guest editors will respond to submissions by July 1, 2019.  Final revisions for provisionally accepted articles will be due September 5, 2019. TSQ accepts submissions without regard to academic affiliation or rank; artists, activists, and graduate students are also welcome to submit materials for consideration.

To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/tsq. If this is your first time using Editorial Manager, please register first, then proceed with submitting your manuscript. Please note that TSQ does not accept simultaneous submissions (i.e., you may not submit the article for consideration elsewhere while it is under consideration at TSQ, and please do not send us manuscripts that are under consideration elsewhere. Manuscripts proposed for this issue cannot be submitted elsewhere until editorial decisions are sent out in July 2019. You may address any technical or formatting queries to tsqjournal@gmail.com. All manuscripts should be double-spaced, including quotations and endnotes, and blinded throughout. Please include an abstract (150 words or less), keywords (3-5 for indexing), and a brief author’s biographical note (50 words or less) at the time of initial submission. See: http://www.dukeupress.edu/Assets/Downloads/TSQ_sg.pdf for a detailed style guide. If you have questions specific to this special issue, please contact the guest editors at tsqamericas@gmail.com.

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is a peer review journal co-edited by Francisco Galarte and Susan Stryker and published by Duke University Press, with editorial offices at the University of Arizona’s Institute for LGBT Studies. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Three issues of TSQ in each volume year are specially themed issues that also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces; one issue each year is an open call, non-themed issue. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other issues, visit: http://lgbt.arizona.edu/tsq-main.

For information about subscriptions, visit:
http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?productid=45648.

CFP: The Europa Issue

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 7.3
Summer, 2020
Editors: Yv E. Nay and Eliza Steinbock

At the heart of European modernity lies the inscription of the transsexual body. 

For The Europa Issue of TSQ, we invite your response to this provocation through research articles of 4000-6000 words as well as reports from the field (e.g. legal and medical case studies, social policy documents, historical vignettes, philosophical texts, conference reports, works of art, cultural and media production, life writing, ethnography, and so on) that engage with a range of methods, lineages and practices, from 1000 to 4000 words in length.

Since the mid-nineteenth century, European empiricism has organized knowledge production according to strictures of observing material ‘truths’ in Nature, birthing manifold practices for studying human beings. The modern Western European worldview remains inextricably linked to this rise in the stature of the Human Sciences and its preoccupation with registering the difference between bodies and developing representational practices for their social classification, moral hierarchization, and ranking as human, subhuman, and non-human. The regulation of “social monstrosity” provided the ground for “regimes of normalization” to sprout and spread across all of society (Foucault, Les Abnormaux, 1974-1975; Stoler, Race and the Education of Desire, 1995). The legitimation of formal and informal forms of governance of these regimes seeded the development of sciencia sexualis, psychiatry, endocrinology, surgery and other medical fields engaged in not only the social regulation of newly identified populations but also the “better breeding” programs of Nation-States furthered by the academic discipline of eugenics. It was in this milieu that the elaboration of the sexological sciences, studying what we would now call “transgender phenomena” (Stryker, “(De)subjugated Knowledges,” 2006), was lead by European figures such as Richard von Krafft-Ebbing with his taxonomy of social deviance, Karl von Westphal and his concept of contrary sexual sentiments, Magnus Hirschfeld and his terminology of transsexualismus, or Havelock Ellis’s notion of eonism. In the wake of the twentieth century’s fascism occurring in and across various parts of Europe and its colonies, sex scientists like Harry Benjamin, together with their concepts for cross-sex and -gender identification, found refuge mainly in the United States. As a consequence, the official terms of medical pathologization -- transexualism, gender identity disorder, and gender dysphoria -- took root in North American private clinics and university programs. This special issue departs from this historical background while at the same time challenging the hold of “European” knowledge production and its traditions in two interrelated clusters of approaches.

First, we aim to interrogate the origin story of the study of transgender phenomena in Europe. We call for contributions that address questions such as the following: What does the study of trans-Atlantic exchanges of ideas and concepts on transgender phenomena bring to our understanding of how transgender has been formulated and regulated? How might investigating the ‘early’ study of transgender as phenomena complicate the narratives of pathologization and inform present-day struggles for the project of “depathologization” of trans identities, gender variance and gender non-conforming persons around the world (Cabral, Suess, Ehrt, Seehole, and Wong, “Removal of gender incongruence of childhood diagnostic category: a human rights perspective,” 2016)? Beyond the archive of a seemingly European history of the study of transgender phenomena, we also call for contributions that refer to what Foucault (Foucault, Il faut défendre la société, 1975-1976) has called “subjugated knowledges,” including what Stryker (2006) has instructively referred to as the basis of transgender studies, thus, to local and historical accounts that have been excluded from the systematization of knowledges that aim at producing coherence by disqualifying embodied knowledge as non-scientific or inferior.

Second, this special issue invites contributions that focus on “provincializing” and “de-centring” European inflections of transgender studies (Chakrabarty Provincializing Europe: PostColonial Thought and Historical Difference, 2000; Kulpa and Mizielińska, De-Centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspectives, 2011). The archives of sexology, anthropology, religion, and law attest to the Eurocentric fascination with and genocidal European practices of exterminating “deviant” or “unnatural” forms of embodiment, claims to gender identity, and social structures for them in cultures within and outside Europe in the context of colonization and imperialism. We welcome contributions that critically scrutinize the impacts of the term ‘transgender,’ what its colonial legacies are, how the term is circulating locally and globally, and how race, ethnicity, class, and geo-political location complicate its circulation and “vitalizes” trans studies and activism (Snorton and Haritaworn, “Trans Necropolitics: A Transnational Reflection on Violence, Death, and the Trans of Color Afterlife,” 2013; Haritaworn, Queer Lovers and Hateful Others: Regenerating Violent Times and Places, 2015). In coordination with European postcolonial and decolonizing projects that also question temporalities/timelines of modernity, what particular insights does a trans optics yield? In this cluster we suggest the method of provincializing and de-centring to be applied to an area (where lies Europe, in what does it consist?) and, also in turn to the related epistemological tradition (what is European trans studies, in what does it consist?).

Thus, we invite contributors to query the institutionalization of transgender studies. We place this call at a time in which European citizens and newcomers are faced with a resurgence of fascisms. How is trans studies and theory vested with Eurocentric privilege, and how is it contested by various racialized, ethnicized, colonized and diasporic communities from outside and within Europe? What are the different terms/ways by which we should evaluate “trans studies” in the European context, where both pathologizing and depathologizing activity occurs? What narratives and case studies challenge the assumption that the ‘center’ of Europe initiates progressive historical change, which the ‘margins’ of Europe would follow? What kinds of hegemonies operate in European gender, sexuality and race studies that impact the ways interdisciplinary transgender studies has developed? Here we call for special attention to Post-Soviet and post-socialist nationalisms, the formation of the European Union and its funding schemes, to different mobilities and patterns of migration, and to language use within Nation-States and between them.

In line with the aim of this special issue and given the fact that TSQ is an English-language peer-reviewed academic journal based in the United States, we encourage authors to contact the editors if they wish to write in a non-English language. We will be able to translate at least one submission that following peer-review is accepted into the issue (in the case where an author does not have access to university funding for translation).

The deadline for submissions is July 1, 2019. All manuscripts should be prepared for anonymous peer review with scholarly citations in Chicago author-date citation style. Any questions should be addressed by e-mail to both guest editors for the issue: Yv E. Nay(yvnay@email.arizona.edu) and Eliza Steinbock (e.a.steinbock@hum.leidenuniv.nl). We plan to respond to submissions by August 2019. Final revisions will be due by November 26, 2019. TSQ accepts submissions without regard to academic affiliation or rank; artists, activists, and graduate students are also welcome to submit materials for consideration.

To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/tsq. Please note that TSQ does not accept simultaneous submissions. Manuscripts proposed for this issue cannot be submitted elsewhere until editorial decisions are sent out. If this is your first time using Editorial Manager, please register first, then proceed with submitting your manuscript. You may address any technical or formatting queries to tsqjournal@gmail.com. All manuscripts should be double-spaced, including quotations and endnotes, and anonymized throughout. Please include an abstract (150 words or less), keywords (3-5 for indexing), and a brief author’s biographical note (50 words or less) at the time of initial submission. See http://www.dukeupress.edu/Assets/Downloads/TSQ_sg.pdf for a detailed style guide.

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is co-edited by Francisco J. Galarte and Susan Stryker, and published by Duke University Press, with editorial offices at the University of Arizona’s Institute for LGBT Studies. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. Most issues of TSQ are themed special issues, with one open call issue each year; all issues contain regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. https://lgbt.arizona.edu/transgender-studies-quarterly. 

CFP: Trans in a Time of HIV/AIDS

TSQ 7.4
Title: Trans in a Time of HIV/AIDS
Guest Editor: Che Gossett

The HIV/AIDS crisis is often imagined as over, yet it remains and is ongoing.  It is still relevant to trans life and trans death, and overlaps with categories and questions of citizenship, belonging, exile, the carceral, the border, the figure of the migrant, disability, queerness, feminism, racialization, biopower and necropolitics, and more.  How might we think about trans in the historical present of HIV/AIDS? How might HIV/AIDS matter for trans studies scholarship at this time, especially in our purportedly post-AIDS-crisis moment? How might the present conjuncture of trans and HIV/AIDS differ from earlier moments? How can we understand the relationship between HIV/AIDS and “trans visibility”? This special issue of TSQ invites work that takes up and thinks through questions at the intersection of HIV/AIDS and trans studies, theory, and politics from any discipline or interdiscipline (or even anti-discipline). Articles should directly address the entanglements of trans and HIV/AIDS whether ontological, epistemological, aesthetic, socio-political, or cultural.  Global and Non-US focused work especially encouraged.  Some potential approaches and optics for authors include but are not limited to:

-- Historical Memory and HIV/AIDS Memorialization

-- Anti-blackness and HIV/AIDS

--Decoloniality and HIV/AIDS

-- Biopower and Necropolitics

-- AIDS Art and Aesthetics

-- Trans Feminisms

-- Cultural Studies of Epidemiology, Public Health, Virology and AIDS Biosciences

--Trans Health Care Activism

-- Disability Studies/Justice

-- Psychoanalytic Theory

We welcome submissions from 1000 to 5,000 words that engage in any of a wide range of methods, disciplines, lineages, and practices, including creative written or visual work, first person accounts, opinion pieces, manifestos, or policy statements.

Please send complete submissions by October 26, 2019. To submit a manuscript, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/tsq. If this is your first time using Editorial Manager, please register first, then proceed with submitting your manuscript. If you have any difficulties with the process, contact the journal at tsqjournal at gmail.com. All manuscripts must be double-spaced, including quotations and endnotes, and blinded throughout. You must also submit an abstract, keywords, and biographical note at the time of initial submission. Please visit the editorial office's website for a detailed style guide. Questions for the editors of this issue may be addressed to Che Gossett (chegossett@gmail.com).

TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly is an academic journal edited by Susan Stryker and Frank Galarte and published by Duke University Press. TSQ aims to be the journal of record for the interdisciplinary field of transgender studies and to promote the widest possible range of perspectives on transgender phenomena broadly defined. One issue of TSQ each year is a non-themed open call, with the other three issues devoted to special themes; every issue also contains regularly recurring features such as reviews, interviews, and opinion pieces. To learn more about the journal and see calls for papers for other special issues, visit  http://lgbt.arizona.edu/transgender-studies-quarterly.  For information about subscriptions, visit https://www.dukeupress.edu/tsq-transgender-studies-quarterly.

Trans∗⁄Religion

August 2019

Volume: 6 Issue: 3

Special Issue Editor(s): Max Strassfeld, Robyn Henderson-Espinoza

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Trans Studies en las Américas

May 2019

Volume: 6 / Number: 2

Special Issue Editor(s): Cole Rizki, Juana Maria Rodriguez, Claudia Sofia Garriga-López, Denilson Lopes

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TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly 6:1

February 2019

Volume: 6 / Number: 1

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Trans∗historicities

November 2018

Volume: 5 / Issue: 4

Editor(s): Leah DeVun, Zeb Tortorici

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Trans-in-Asia

August 2018

Volume: 5 / Issue: 3

Editor(s): Howard Chiang; Todd A. Henry; Helen Hok-Sze Leung

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The Surgery Issue

May 2018

Volume: 5 / Issue: 2

Editor(s): Eric Plemons and Chris Straayer

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General Issue

February 2018

Volume: 5 / Issue: 1

Editor(s): Susan Stryker and Paisley Currah

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Transpsychoanalytics

November 2017

Volume: 4 / Issue: 3-4

Editor(s): Sheila L. Cavanagh

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The Issue of Blackness

Volume: Volume 4 / Issue: Number 2

Editor(s): Treva Ellison, Kai M. Green, Matt Richardson, and C. Riley Snorton

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