Academic Year 2007-2008

Fall 2007

ANTH 438A: Women's Health in Global Perspective
Instructor: Pike
INDV 101: Mind, Self, and Language
The Politics of Difference
Instructor: Peterson
INDV 102: Social Interactions and Relationships
Sex, Health & AIDS Feminist Theories
Instructor: TBA
INDV 102: Social Interactions and Relationships
Lesbian & Gay Studies
Instructor: Luibheid
HIST 202: History of Modern Sexualities
Instructor: TBA
POL 433: Feminist Political Theory
Instructor: Peterson
PSYC 364: Human Sexuality
Correspondence Course
SOC 222: Gender Identities, Interactions and Relationships
Instructor: Andrews
SOC 324: Sociology of Sexuality
Instructor: Crockett
Instructor: Guidry
SOC 448: Sociology of the Body
Instructor: M. Wright
WS 305 001: Feminist Theories
Instructor: Soto
WS 358 001: U.S. & 3rd World Feminism
Instructor: TBA
WS496G 001: History of Eugenics & Reproductive Politics
Instructor: TBA
WS498 001: Senior Capstone
Instructor: Joseph
WS 500 001: Gender, Culture & Capitalism
Gender in a Transnational World
Instructor: Joseph
WS 500 002: Piety & Feminine Politics
Instructor: Geary
WS 696G 001: Queer Theories
Instructor: Soto

Spring 2008

CPH 330: HUMAN SEXUALITY (3 units)
Instructor: TBA
Discussion of the basic aspects of human sexuality, including male and female reproductive physiology, congenital defects, sexually transmitted diseases, myths and fallacies, variations of sexual response.
CPH 451: INTRODUCTION TO VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN (3 units)
Instructor: TBA
Considers psychological, physical, and sexual abuse of women and girls. Addresses frequency, causes, and health impacts, cultural forces shaping responses, community services and prevention. Summarizes knowledge and examines controversies in battering, date rape, and pornography. disorders, violence and health care.
EDL 270: SOCIAL JUSTICE LEADERSHIP (2 units)
Instructor: Professor Perez
Societal issues (gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability, religion, class) will be discussed. The course will equip students with skills to bring about positive societal change in the community by increasing personal awareness expanding knowledge, and encouraging action.
ENGL 362: RHETORICAL TRADITIONS (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Licona
In this course, students will be introduced to diverse rhetorical theories and practices that emanate from non-dominant groups/locations. While this course will focus on raced rhetorics and rhetorics of race, students will also explore rhetorics that have grown out of the politics of class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in contemporary contexts. Students will study rhetorical theories offering alternatives to traditional approaches in order to explore the relationship between discourse, the production of knowledge, and practices of representation from diverse (cultural) locations. In considering the production of knowledge as a raced, gendered, and contested process, students will (re)consider who the holders and creators of knowledge are across multiple contexts. Course materials, including essays and in-class films, will address historical implications of language as it has been used to (mis)represent. Readings will reveal the transformative and emancipatory potentials of alternative rhetorical practices and performances. To achieve these goals, readings will include both theories of alternative rhetorical practice for students to discuss and emulate and essays that address these topics as models for the students' own analytical practice. The ability to communicate across borders of difference will be a goal embedded in each course unit. Assignments will be designed to engage students in the theories, practices, and implications of alternative and comparative rhetorics. There is an emphasis in this course on class discussion and participation.
ENGL 465: VICTORIAN LITERATURE (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Aiken
"Victorian": the term often conjures up notions of prudery, repression, and narrow moralism. Yet seldom in history has there been a more volatile era. England in the nineteenth century underwent cultural transformations that destabilized traditional values, institutions, and social arrangements, unsettling received notions of self, sexuality, nature, society, and the arts. In this course we will read some of the major literary texts of the period, considering how they both responded and contributed to this cultural context, and thereby helped to shape the world we have inherited.
HIST 457A: MANHOOD+MASCULINIY IN U.S. (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Irvin
In this course we will chart the history of the male gender in America. Of primary concern will be the dialogic relationship between manhood: the lived experiences of American men: and masculinity: the norms and ideals of manhood constructed within American culture. The course will proceed chronologically, from colonization to the present, tracing the evolution of manhood and masculinity relative to the economic and social development of the United States. Along the way, several themes will recur. Those themes include the manner in which capitalism, particularly its systems of production and consumption, has shaped gender; the relationships between American men and women in the home and workplace; the impact of the frontier and American expansionism on masculine identities; the hegemonic history of white male heterosexuality relative to the manhood and masculinities of Native Americans, African Americans, and Latinos, and of gay, bisexual, and transgendered men; and, perhaps most significantly, the reaches and limitations of gender as a determinant of individual identity.
INDV/WS 102: LESBIAN AND GAY STUDIES (3 units)
Instructor: TBA
A study of issues related to sexual identity of individuals, communities, and whole societies. Special attention to norms and categories and to conceptual binaries such as Natural/Unnatural, Health/Illness, Knowledge/Ignorance, Public/Private, Same/Different, Hetero/Homo. The course is interdisciplinary with units drawn from sciences and arts as well as from the social studies.
INDV 102: SOCIAL INTERACTIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS (3 units)
Instructor: TBA
Sex, Health & AIDS Feminist Theories
MAS 365: LATINOS+LATINAS:EMRG ISU (3 units)
Instructor: Professor O'Leary
Using a comparative and multi-disciplinary focus this course critically examines major issues in Latino/a scholarship. Major topics include: immigration, political economy, class, the politics of ethnic identity creation and maintenance, the construction of race, gender, sexuality, and policy issues.
PSYC 364: HUMAN SEXUALITY (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Menchola
Social-psychological and developmental aspects of human sexuality. Examples of topics include: courtship, pregnancy and delivery, sexual health, and sex education.
SOC 324: SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITY (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Crockett
Impact of individual and community sexual attitudes and behaviors on other sociological and psychological functioning.
SOC 448 : SOCIOLOGY OF THE BODY (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Ulrich
Sociology of the Body examines the relationship between society and the human body, from broad issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, to everyday trends such as dieting, body building, and tattooing.
WS 312: LATINA/O POP: RACE, GENDER, SEXUALITY & POPULAR CULTURE
Instructor: Professor Gutierrez
This course examines how Latinas/os have been a major force in the production of popular culture. In particular we will critically examine discourses of "Latinidad" (a seamless construction of Latinos as a monolithic group) in the corporate production of identities. This lack of attention to national origin and historical specificity is one definition of Latinidad. Latinidad also provides the contradictory grounds where consumer culture meets Latina/o performance. Some artists choose to reappropriate commercial spaces as sites of empowerment, while others are complicit in perpetuating stereotypical representations of Latinas/os. With special attentiveness to the body, we will explore the construction of Latina/o identities as they influence and produce particular racial, sexual and gendered identities. The body becomes an essential marker of "Latinidad," which is constantly connected to notions of sexuality. We will also examine the material effects of such cultural and commercial practices upon U.S. Latino populations, reminding us that there are real-world implications for these performances as they commodify Latina/o culture. To account for the shifts in notions of performance and cultural practices, the focus of the course will center Latina/o/Chicana/o musical production, movies, television, advertising, magazines, literary texts, performance art, murals, installation art, music videos, and animation within a historical context.
WS/CPH 487: INTERPRETATIONS OF WOMEN'S HEALTH (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Geary
This course will examine "women's health" as a site of intense moral, social and political concern, historically and in contemporary contexts. We will ask how the "concern" for women's health is framed and interpreted, and for what ends? Issues that may be considered: reproductive health; sexual and domestic violence; environmental health; sexually transmitted diseases; professional and "volunteer" caregiving; and the contemporary economic restructuring of health and social welfare.
WS/ANTH 496T: QUEER--LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER--HISTORIES OF NORTH AMERICA (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Kennedy
The main focus of this course is on the development of lesbian and gay community and politics in North America in the 20th century, but it will start with colonial America and end up with transnational queer life in the post-Stonewall period. The course aims to develop an appreciation for sexual diversity in North American history.
WS/ENGL 554: CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST THEORIES (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Joseph
This course examines the works of a selection of contemporary feminist theorists and scholars. These works address issues of longstanding concern for feminists including: the space and time of politics; agency, subjection and desire; theories and methods of knowledge production; and, strategies for social change. We will be reading whole books by each author in order to explore the ways they have conceptualized and enacted their projects. This course presumes substantial background in social and cultural theory (especially Marxism, Critical Theory, Psychoanalysis and Poststructuralism) and does not provide that background; students will be expected to do extra reading as needed to understand the main texts under discussion. This course will be run as a seminar; all students are expected to participate actively in and contribute substantively to the class discussions.
WS/ANTH 696M: SEXUALITY AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION (3 units)
Instructor: Professor Luibheid
The course examines sexuality as the site where multiple concerns about international migration (including social, cultural, political, economic and national) are expressed and contested, in the context of globalization and transnationalism.